The Curious Me

I was just doing some routine cleaning with my camera and then come to my mind to do some speed test for the memory card that I use. So the title, ScanDisk vs ADATA is pretty much self-explanatory.

I am still using Nikon D90 and I think the camera still useable for another 5 years, given that I’m using it like a film camera.

All these while, I’m using an SDHC card by ScanDisk. ScanDisk here is the brand. This is a class 4 memory card. This memory card only have the capacity of 8 Gigabytes.

Then now, I got this ADATA brand microSD card that comes with the capacity of 32 Gigabytes. It’s a class 10 memory card. I only realize this when I’m writing this blog post. But let’s continue as I try to make my point.

ScanDisk vs ADATA

ScanDisk and ADATA Memory Card

Benchmarking The Cards – ScanDisk vs ADATA Test Results

I’m using macOS so I use an app called Blackmagic Disk Speed Test to benchmark these two cards.

Here are the results of the tests.

ScanDisk Speed Test Result

ScanDisk Speed Test Result

  • ScanDisk
  • Write 4.4 MB/s
  • Read 19.9 MB/s
  • Class 4
  • 8 Gigabytes
ADATA Speed Test Results

ADATA Speed Test Results

  • Write 7.1 MB/s
  • Read 45.7 MB/s
  • Class 10
  • 32 Gigabytes

Both tests are carried out using my iMac card slots with stress test of 5 Gigabytes.

Why Did I Even Bother?

ADATA is an unknown brand to me. The card was given to me as a “throwaway” gift. So I thought it’s just some cheap, cloned, made in China cards. I was skeptical on its durability and the speed. But since it have bigger capacity than the ScanDisk card (8 Gigabytes vs 32 Gigabytes!) I decide just to use it with my Nikon D90. Another form factor that makes me feel skeptical with the ADATA card is because it’s a microSD card but comes with the adapter that make it usable with my Nikon D90.

My Last thought

Even though the ADATA was marked as class 10 memory card, the write speed only comes to almost double the class 4 card is. However the reading speed of the card is impressive! Though in write-excessive operation like using it inside a camera where I shoot RAW, it won’t help much.

Anyway, now my doubts have been cleared after I did this test and I’ll still keep around that 8 Gigabytes ScanDisk card as backup plan somewhere inside my camera bag.

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